Port City Music Hall
Wovenhand

Wovenhand

Jaye Jayle

Wed, September 11, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Port City Music Hall

Portland, ME

$15 Advance / $20 Day of Show

This event is all ages

Buy tickets in person at the Port City Music Hall box office (504 Congress Street) Wednesday-Friday 10AM-5PM, charge by phone at 800-745-3000, or online right here. PCMH box office will open one hour before doors night of show.

Wovenhand
Wovenhand
The music of Wovenhand and songwriter/multi-instrumentalist David Eugene Edwards has always had an unparalleled intensity. Edwards’ rich, billowing and emotive voice is always the driving force of his music, but it’s catapulted by his spellbinding ability to transform instruments that many people might consider mundane relics — be it banjo, accordion, lesser-known folk instruments from around the world, or even an electric guitar — into devices of dark fury and poignant beauty.

From the apocalyptic revivification of antique Americana of Sixteen Horsepower in the 90s to the threadbare balladry of Wovenhand’s early releases, Edwards’ music has maintained its celestial heaviness as it evolved. But now in its current incarnation, Wovenhand is a band that fully expands that power with exacting and inventive skill. It’s a sound so distinctive and compellingly crushing that even the heaviest of metal bands can’t match.

Wovenhand’s current lineup includes guitarist Chuck French, bassist Neil Keener (both of Planes Mistaken For Stars) and drummer Ordy Garrison, now joined by piano/synth player Matthew Smith (Crime & The City Solution). Star Treatment was recorded at Steve Albini’s legendary Electrical Audio in Chicago with engineer Sanford Parker, who also helmed Wovenhand’s 2014 album Refractory Obdurate.

While Wovenhand ought to be a familiar name to anyone interested in forward-thinking music, the album title Star Treatment isn’t a reference to our celebrity culture obsession. Rather, it’s a clever reference to concepts of astrolatry, or humanity’s enduring interest in the stars of the night sky.

“It’s ethereal in its concept,” Edwards explains. “There are many layers, as always. I’ve been paying attention to the stars in the sky and in literature, and it’s a theme throughout the album.”

Star Treatment kicks off full tilt with the anthemic charge of “Come Brave” — the song’s galloping four-on-the-floor drums driving churning swells of droning, chiming guitars and organ as Edwards’ soaring voice compels us to rise and join the fray. “The Hired Hand” takes a more Western bent with swaggering guitars awash in reverb and a throbbing bass line before the chorus erupts with massive open guitar chords as Edwards howls, “give up your dead.” Further, “Crystal Palace” sounds like Eastern European folk driven through a massive wall of amplifiers while a full gospel choir sings just beneath the gurgling surface of guitars. “Crook and Flail” sounds exotic in its twanging acoustic instruments and tabla/dumbec drum pattern. Elsewhere, “Golden Blossom” is a lush and beautifully unabashed love song, strummed out in a simple, catchy melody that builds to crescendo with the chorus refrain, “only you, my love and your light.” Throughout, Wovenhand deftly merge the outer reaches of rock and world folk sounds with increasing urgency and force.

Star Treatment will be available worldwide excluding Europe on LP, CD and download via Sargent House on September 23rd, 2016.
Jaye Jayle
Jaye Jayle
Jaye Jayle’s earliest recordings consisted of four 7” singles packaged in the bare-bones dust jackets of early country 45s and etched with the stark Americana-noir of Louisville-based singer/guitarist Evan Patterson. The material was a significant departure from Patterson’s primary musical endeavor at the time—the percussive Sturm und Drang power trio Young Widows—but it fell in line with his ongoing creative arc of embracing of negative space, acknowledging that less is more, realizing that a whisper can speak louder than a yell.

On their new album No Trails and Other Unholy Paths, Jaye Jayle’s transportive desolation and hallucinatory sonic mantras are fully documented in all their glory. With his cohorts Todd Cook (Shipping News, The For Carnation) on bass, Neal Argabright (Phantom Family Halo, Freakwater) on drums, and Corey Smith (Phantom Family Halo) on auxiliary instrumentation, Patterson weaves a tapestry of neo-folk’s economy, krautrock’s experiments in repetition, skid row’s darkest blues, Midwestern indie rock’s nihilism, and early Tangerine Dream’s analog oscillations. The album seethes with tension and anticipation, with a heightened push-and-pull on tracks like “Marry Us” and the second song titled “No Trail” when songwriter Emma Ruth Rundle adds call-and-response vocals to the mix. It’s been a considerable journey from those raw and intimate early 7”s, an evolution undoubtedly affected by the relentless touring schedule that transformed Jaye Jayle from a solo project to an immersive collaboration.

“The album has a lyrical theme in motion and direction, searching and questioning, and discovery,” Patterson explains. “A certainty in placement and uncertainty in destination. Primal consideration for surroundings, which may be or may not have been the surroundings sought after. The grayness of life's paths. The where-have-I-been, where-am-I-now, and where-will-I-be.” It’s a wanderer’s approach that yielded an unlikely romance and expatriate dreams between Patterson and Rundle during a European tour together in support of their split 12” The Time Between Us. It’s an approach also taken to the studio, where the band worked with film composer Dean Hurley—David Lynch’s music supervisor of the last twelve years—to serve as producer. The songs were recorded at Earth Analog by Warren Christopher Gray and handed off to Hurley to manipulate at his will. The result is an album that retains its frugal approach but pushes its aural dimensions to their thresholds.
Venue Information:
Port City Music Hall
504 Congress St
Portland, ME, 04101